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Summer Sun Safety

 

Jenny Potter PA-C discusses summer skin damage and how how to prevent it with WFMJ on the Morning Show.

 

Jenny Potter PA-C on WFMJ- Click the photo to watch her interview. 

 

Check out our Sun Protection Tips below!

 

  • What are the basics of sun safety?
  1. Wear sunscreen
  2. Wear protective clothing – New clothing brands with Ultraviolent Protection Factor (UPF) with bathing suits, wide-brimmed hats, shirts, pants, dresses, etc. (Coolibar, Cabana Life, UV Skinz, Columbia “Omni-Shade”)
    1. A typical T-shirt has SPF less than 15, and a wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection.
  3. Seek Shade. “If your shadow is shorter than you are, seek shade.” The sun is strongest between 10AM and 2PM.

 

  • What’s the difference between sunblock and sunscreen?
    • All sunblocks and sunscreens are now called “sunscreens” per the FDA.
      • Chemical Sunscreens take about 15 min to take effect.
      • Physical blocker sunscreens use Zinc oxide or Titanium dioxide and work immediately.

 

  • What kind of sunscreen should I use? How should I apply it?
    • Look for “broad-spectrum”, which means that it protects against both UVA and UVB rays.
      • UVB burns you, and UVA ages you (goes through glass and clouds). Both can cause skin cancer.
    • Use at least SPF 30. Higher SPF can block more UV rays; however, no sunscreen can block 100% of UVB rays. They all last the same amount of time.
    • Make sure it says “water-resistant” if swimming or sweating. No sunscreen can be called “waterproof” or “sweat proof” any longer.
    • Reapply every 2 hours, or more frequently if swimming/sweating.
    • The best sunscreen is the one you’re going to use.
    • FDA requires all sunscreens retain their original strength for at least 3 years (write the date of purchase on the bottle). If expired, throw it out.
    • Don’t use Sunscreen and insect repellant combination The sunscreen needs to be applied generously and more frequently than insect repellant; therefore, they should be used separately.
    • Avoid exposing babies younger than 6 months to the sun’s rays. Photoprotective clothing is a great option for infants. Sunscreens with Zinc oxide or Titanium dioxide can cause less irritation to infants’ sensitive skin.

 

  • When should I wear sunscreen?
    • Wear sunscreen every day on your face and other sun-exposed regions.
    • Apply chemical sunscreens to dry skin 15 minutes BEFORE going outdoors. Remember the lips with a lip balm with SPF and your eyes with Sunglasses!

 

  • Who should wear sunscreen?
    • Everyone needs to wear sunscreen. Anyone can get skin cancer, regardless of age, gender or race. It’s estimated that 1/5 Americans develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Skin cancer is highly treatable when caught early.

 

  • What about getting a “base tan”?
    • There is no such thing as a “healthy” tan. Getting a “base tan” will not protect you from the damaging UV rays.
    • Please avoid tanning beds!!! We’re seeing younger and younger patients with melanoma and other skin cancers secondary to tanning bed use. And they cause you to age more quickly!

 

  • What about getting enough Vitamin D?
    • You can get your adequate Vitamin D through a healthy diet that may include supplements. Please discuss with your doctor.

 


Clear is Here!

 

What is It?  Clear is the newest membership available at Lloyd Dermatology Center and Skin Basic. Clear was designed specifically for our acne prone patients, and is intended to help get your skin clear with discounts on acne treatment products, peels, and solar protection.

How does it work? Our Clear membership ties into both the Skin Basic store and the practice. This is our third membership program, following the Advance and Basic Memberships.

*This membership has additional perks, including a complimentary dermatologist recommended BPO wash, moisturizing sunscreen, and a microdermabrasion treatment.  The membership enables you to receive discounts on all acne treatment products within Skin Basic, as well as chemical peels and our newest procedure to improve acne, SEBACIA.

 

Don’t take our word, take Jake’s!  Check out Jake’s experience with Sebacia!

*Contact our office to get more information about our membership programs, and how to schedule your Sebacia consultation.   330-758-9189


Doctors warn not to neglect your skin during winter

Click the photo for WKBN interview

 

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio (WKBN) – The cold weather is here, and there are some things you may be doing that are damaging your skin.

Dr. Jenifer Lloyd from the Lloyd Dermatology Center in Youngstown warns that our skin dries out during the winter because of the cold elements and there is less humidity in the air. She says people also forget that the sun can damage our skin even in the winter and recommends always wearing a sunblock.

“The difference between sunblock and sunscreen is a sunblock that blocks out all of the sun’s rays whereas a sunscreen blocks out just the tanning rays. I recommend wearing a sunblock so you don’t get any sun hitting your skin and wear it every single day,” Lloyd said.

Lloyd says showering every day and the soaps we use are a marketing tool for skin care companies, but it’s important to make sure those soaps aren’t too harsh.

Lloyd offers the following tips to keep skin healthy during the dry, winter months:

  • Cool down your shower. Don’t take hot showers, it’s really hard on your skin
  • Change your soap. Switching to a milder soap such as Dove or Vanicream can make a big difference in your skin
  • Moisturize. Put some on every day, especially when you get out of the shower to help seal in moisture
  • Wear sunblock every day, even in the winter the sun comes through the clouds

Many people hit the tanning beds once winter sets in, but skin care experts warn about potential dangers.

Researchers estimate that indoor tanning may cause upwards of 400,000 cases of skin cancer in the U.S. each year.

We’ve all heard the warnings of how dangerous tanning beds can be. But what may surprise you is the number of cancer cases related to tanning beds.

Studies show a 59% increase in the risk of melanoma in those who have been exposed to UV radiation from indoor tanning. To date, more than 40 states restrict access to indoor tanning equipment either through banning their use by minors or requiring parental consent.

Lloyd agrees that using a tanning bed is a terrible option for getting darker skin. She says spray tans and bronzers are a safer alternative. She offers the following tips for those:

Find one you like and practice with it. Don’t try a new one for the first time before a big event, there is an art to it

  • Bronzers tend to pick up around the knees, elbows and places with a little bit more rough skin. It can look streaky, so there is definitely a practice to it
  • If you have dry skin, try a heavy cream or lotion that you are used to

Finally, always apply sunscreen. Snow reflects the sun and can damage your skin.


Sunscreen Versus Sunblock

 

 

 

 

 

Doctors warn against getting that summer glow- VIDEO HERE

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio (WKBN) – Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, and it is the number one cancer in people ages 24 to 29. That’s why there is an awareness campaign to protect yourself against harmful rays.

Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, but it is preventable and treatable if caught early. Dermatologists want to bring attention to the importance of protecting your skin from the sun.

There are several things you can do to reduce your risk. The first is don’t burn. A person’s risk for melanoma doubles with five or more sunburns at any point in life. Also, avoid tanning and tanning beds.

Dr. Jenifer Lloyd says you should always opt for a sunblock instead of a sunscreen.

“A sunblock physically blocks all of the rays from the sun. It sits on the surface of the skin and works instantly. If you put sunblock on right now, you could go outside right away,” Lloyd said. “A sunscreen is a chemical that interacts with the top layer of your skin, and you have to put it on 30 minutes before you go outside for that reaction to take place.”

Lloyd says there isn’t any FDA criteria for labels when it comes to sunblock and sunscreen. In order to know what you are buying, she says you have to look at the ingredients. Sunblock should contain zinc, titanium and iron oxide.

There are many products that make it easy to protect your skin, and many are not greasy. Lloyd wears a powder sunscreen daily. She also recommends protective clothing.

“Sun protective clothing you don’t have to reapply; you just simply put it on and it protects you all day. It’s lightweight, it’s airy, it’s breathable and much better than a cotton t-shirt. A cotton t-shirt has an SPF of 8, especially when it’s wet. This clothing has an SPF of 50 to 100.”

Detection is also an important factor. Lloyd recommends getting your skin checked by a dermatologist at least once a year. You should also be examining your skin and moles at home. If you notice a change in an existing mole or discover any new spot that doesn’t heal after several weeks, see a doctor immediately.

There are several free apps for your mobile devices that can help you map, measure and monitor moles.


Alternatives to Sunscreen for Kids

With the emphasis on chemical free, and natural products, some parents show concern over putting sunscreen on their child, however, dermatologists say there are natural alternatives.

The summer months see more children outdoors, playing, partying, and diving into the water.

If these children aren’t properly protected, they could be exposed to dangerous UV rays.

It takes only a few moments for a child’s skin to start to burn, but with concerns over chemicals and toxins, many doctors do say that children cannot tolerate many of the chemicals in sunscreen as well as adults.

The FDA has recommended that children under 6 months old, do not use sunscreen, however, dermatologist Jennifer Lloyd has an alternative to conventional sunscreen.

Dr. Lloyd told 21 News, “So sunblock technically contains zinc and titanium init, so it blocks the skin. Zinc and titanium are what is in Desitin.”

Dr. Lloyd said to avoid sunscreens that contain harsh chemicals like avobenzone and other parabens that can irritate a little one’s skin.

In addition to zinc and titanium sunblock, Dr. Loyd suggests parents consider clothing that’s rich in SPF.

Dr. Lloyd said, “I think for kids sun protective clothing is the easiest thing to do.”

If buying a new summer wardrobe is not in the budget, there is an alternative that is as easy as tossing clothes in the washer.

“You can buy RIT Dye, which has a sun-protecting wash in it, that you can wash into your clothing.” Dr. Lloyd continued.

These are tips that can protect children for the summer, and for the rest of their lives.

 


Our Office

Lloyd Dermatology Center

8060 Market Street
Youngstown, OH 44512

Phone: 330.758.9189Fax: 330.758.4487

Office Hours:

Monday, Wednesday
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Tuesday
7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m

Thursday
7:00 a.m. – 5:45 p.m

Friday
7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m